Public charging power capacity: key to EV charging

Deployment of public charging infrastructure in anticipation of growth in EV sales is critical for widespread EV adoption In countries such as Norway, the deployment of public charging infrastructure has played a vital role in supporting the growth of EV sales. As of the end of 2022, there were 25 BEVs per public charging point in Norway, compared to 1.3 in 2011. This growth in EV sales can only be sustained if charging demand is met by accessible and affordable infrastructure, either through private charging in homes or at work or publicly accessible charging stations.
Deployment of public charging infrastructure in anticipation of growth in EV sales is critical for widespread EV adoption In countries such as Norway, the deployment of public charging infrastructure has played a vital role in supporting the growth of EV sales. As of the end of 2022, there were 25 BEVs per public charging point in Norway, compared to 1.3 in 2011. This growth in EV sales can only be sustained if charging demand is met by accessible and affordable infrastructure, either through private charging in homes or at work or publicly accessible charging stations.

Despite this, some markets, characterized by widespread availability of home charging, have a higher ratio of EVs per public charging point. For example, in the United States, the ratio of EVs per charger is 24, and in Norway, it is more than 30. As the market penetration of EVs increases, public charging becomes increasingly important, even in these countries, to support EV adoption among drivers who do not have access to private home or workplace charging options. However, the optimal ratio of EVs per charger will differ based on local conditions and driver needs.

Perhaps more important than the number of public chargers available is the total public charging power capacity per EV, given that fast chargers can serve more EVs than slow chargers. During the early stages of EV adoption, it makes sense for available charging power per EV to be high, assuming that charger utilisation will be relatively low until the market matures, and the utilisation of infrastructure becomes more efficient.

In line with this, the European Union’s provisional agreement on the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Regulation (AFIR) includes requirements for the total power capacity to be provided based on the size of the registered fleet. Globally, the average public charging power capacity per electric LDV is around 2.4 kW per EV. In the European Union, the ratio is lower, with an average around 1.2 kW per EV. Korea has the highest ratio at 7 kW per EV, even with most public chargers (90%) being slow chargers.

The deployment of public charging infrastructure is critical for the growth and widespread adoption of EVs. Governments and industry players must work together to ensure that charging infrastructure is accessible, affordable, and efficient to meet the needs of EV drivers. The optimal ratio of EVs per charger will differ based on local conditions and driver needs, and it is crucial to ensure that public charging power capacity per EV is high, particularly during the early stages of EV adoption. By addressing these challenges, we can accelerate the shift towards electrification and create a more sustainable future.

 

Source: Global EV Outlook 2023 | IEA
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