How to guarantee green batteries in Europe

This report discusses the new EU rules for battery production, focusing on the calculation and reporting of carbon footprints. It highlights the potential for greenwashing by battery manufacturers using green energy certificates, and the importance of locating production facilities near low carbon energy sources. The report emphasizes the need for stricter rules to ensure minimal carbon emissions and incentivize the use of renewable electricity.
However, the details of how companies will calculate their carbon emissions, including how they can account for the use of renewable energy, are still being worked out. If designed without loopholes, the new battery carbon footprint rules will ensure minimal carbon emissions associated with the massive deployment of batteries, such as in electric cars and renewable energy storage.

The location of battery production is crucial to the carbon footprint of battery production. A battery produced in Sweden would have a carbon footprint of 64 gCO2e/kWh, whereas a battery produced in a higher carbon grid in Germany would have a carbon footprint of 85 gCO2e/kWh. In comparison, a battery produced with the average Chinese grid has a carbon footprint of 105 gCO2e/kWh. Thus, it is essential that the calculation and verification rules for the battery carbon footprint incentivize locating battery production facilities near low-carbon energy sources.

Battery makers can choose to use the average grid emissions of the country where their batteries are produced or plant-specific values. However, the credibility of these claims depends on the rules for calculating these values. The current report by the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) would allow battery makers to purchase green energy certificates throughout the EU market, which could lead to significant greenwashing. This is because the current green energy certificate system does not account for real-time energy sourcing or actual energy feeds between consumption and production.

How to guarantee green batteries in Europe | Transport & Environment
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