Global firms drive sustainable mobility in emerging markets

In a landmark shift towards sustainable transportation, companies across the globe are ramping up their investments in Emerging Market and Developing Economies (EMDEs), reveals the recent report by the World Business Council's Zero Emission Vehicle Emerging Markets Initiative. This surge in investments is primarily focused on accelerating the shift towards clean and sustainable mobility options in these regions.
A pivotal aspect of this movement is the enhancement of electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure, with several initiatives leading the way. Enel X Way Chile Spa is making strides by building public charging stations in Chile, Colombia, and Brazil, each equipped with over 20 DC fast charging connectors. This initiative is a game-changer for business fleets, already supporting over 400 electric vehicles in Chile, with plans to double this capacity shortly.

In Türkiye, Eşarj is emerging as a major player, currently owning 700 AC fast and DC slow charging stations. The company’s ambitious plan to expand to more than 2,500 charging stations is poised to significantly cut down CO2 emissions, with an estimated reduction of 598 million kg. Eşarj’s commitment to sustainability is further underscored by its use of 100% renewable energy in its charging network.

The push for sustainable mobility is not limited to charging infrastructure. Major corporations are actively participating in the fleet decarbonisation trend. Amazon’s operations in India include a delivery fleet of 6,000 EVs, with an expansion plan to reach 10,000 by 2025. Similarly, DHL aims to electrify 60% of its global last-mile fleet by 2030, with a significant investment earmarked for Latin America. IKEA India is also on track to achieve 100% zero emissions for home deliveries by 2025, already accomplishing more than half of this target.

Taxi and rental services are also joining the EV movement. Uber’s ambitious plan aims for 100% zero emissions by 2040, which includes adding 50,000 EVs to its platform in India. Grab in Indonesia has a robust rental fleet of 8,500 battery-electric vehicles, backed by more than 800 battery-swapping stations.

In addition to these initiatives, the management of battery lifecycle is gaining attention. Veolia’s electric car battery recycling facility in China represents a significant step towards sustainable battery usage, recycling the equivalent of 100,000 EV batteries.

The efforts of these global companies in EMDEs reflect a strong commitment to environmental stewardship and signal a transformative shift in the transportation sector. By investing in sustainable mobility solutions, these companies are not only contributing to the reduction of the global carbon footprint but are also paving the way for a greener, more sustainable future in transportation.

Source: Zero Emission Vehicle Emerging Markets Initiative | World Business Council

Source: Zero Emission Vehicle Emerging Markets Initiative | World Business Council
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