Cities boost mobility networks & EV charging infrastructure

New economic difficulties and increased extreme weather cannot derail efforts by cities to improve their mobility networks at a time when they are still recuperating from the COVID-19 disruptions. To maintain resilience and stimulate economic vitality, they require effective and equitable mobility networks.
According to the 2022 edition of the Urban Mobility Readiness Index, a ranking of how well-positioned global cities are to guide mobility’s next chapter, many cities have already put these strategies into practice, including extensive and reasonably priced transit systems and more shared options like e-bikes and scooters.

San Francisco takes the top spot this year due to its close proximity to companies in Silicon Valley and its robust ecosystem for autonomous and mobility-as-a-service technologies. The Golden Gate city has also made substantial investments in reliable charging infrastructure and offers great incentives for users to purchase electric vehicles. And while San Francisco’s use of public transportation isn’t as great as it might be because of a system that is focused on cars, the city implemented “slow” roadways during lockdown procedures to enable more micro-mobility options like cycling and walking.

Oslo, known as the “EV capital of the world,” has dominated the sustainability index for the past two years and is unlikely to relinquish that position very soon given the advantage it has gained. The city has an extensive network of charging stations and offers EV owners a wide range of benefits, including reduced toll prices and preferential access to specific roadways. Due to the overwhelming number of EV drivers in Oslo, the municipal administration has even started to eliminate some incentives, such as free parking, because they are no longer essential.

To cover the expense of new solutions and fairly improve the standard of living across all areas, a stronger contribution from the business sector is essential. For example, several businesses in New York are helping low-income areas by covering the cost of e-bikes. Although public-private collaborations might hasten their development, efforts to increase EV charging infrastructure are mainly carried out by automakers and other private businesses. For instance, Zurich collaborated with a manufacturing company to commission 45 electric bus charging stations that will be set up this year.

Source: Urban Mobility Readiness Index | The Oliver Wyman Forum

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Source: Urban Mobility Readiness Index | The Oliver Wyman Forum
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